Guest Author Interview – Bill Miller

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Title: End of the Rainbow

Genre: Politics & Social Sciences/Violence in Society

Synopsis: End of the Rainbow by Bill Miller Politics, religion, racism, and sexuality are just some of the issues that force us to live in a world filled with madness and hate. All of these are controversial topics, but they don’t have to be, nor should they. Yet, we will fight and even kill just because someone else’s opinions and beliefs are different from our own. It’s impossible to understand the human mind, what makes us tick, and what sets us off. We are all so different, not referencing physical makeup or genetics, but our thought processes, behavioral patterns, what we believe in, and why. Most of us don’t even pay attention to ourselves, and most of the things that we do are second nature—born of habit and then done instinctively, because we have been a certain way for so long. The friction that exists between the peoples of the world today will not die, but will be sustained and nourished by hate and vengeance until we learn to take control of ourselves and be the people that we should be. Yet, that is not what we care to do. We would rather fight.

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Bill Miller, Author

CH: Today’s Guest Author is Bill Miller, who is a great writer with a powerful topic, today. Welcome back, Bill.

CH: Can you sum up your book in 20 words or less?

BM: The world is changing, we have to change with it. Don’t be afraid of diversity, embrace it, or be miserable.

CH: Kirkus Review described the book as “a passionate call for social change.” What inspired you to write this book?

BM: I was inspired to write this book because it bothers me when I see people mistreating others just because they are different—different race, different religion, different ethnic background, and sexual preference…whatever. Other peoples’ looks and beliefs do not have to be the same as mine in order for me to like them. In fact, the only thing that I care about is that we live in peace, and they can believe in whatever they want to believe in. The only thing that matters is that we live together free of hatred and fighting.

CH: When you are coming up with a new idea for a book, do you look at the market for topic trends? Or do you just write about your preferred topic?

BM: I like writing about current social and political issues—topics that are controversial. In the past, I preferred keeping my social and political thoughts to myself. In the last couple of years, I have developed the desire to express my views on controversial issues, especially, as they relate to the United States of America. It has always been necessary for all citizens to stand up for what they believe. If we don’t, then someone or some group will force something down our throats that we can’t swallow.

CH: How did you pick the title for this book?

BM: When we speak of the diverse skin tones in a population of people, we often refer to that diversity as, “a rainbow of colors.” Today, more and more children are born from interracial relationships. I believe that human genetics will eventually become mixed to the point that we cannot be identified, recognized, or distinguished by the color of our skin. Therefore, the title of my latest book is, End of The Rainbow. The title references my belief that all of us will someday be genetically mixed to the point that what we refer to today as “a rainbow of colors” will no longer be applicable. Instead, we will become a blend of colors with all of us having similar complexions. It will then be the end of the rainbow.

CH: Who is your target audience—politicians or citizens?

BM: My target audience includes both politicians, and citizens. I reach out to citizens to make them aware, and in some cases, just to remind them of the social constraints that affect not just minorities, but all of us, regardless of race. When we vote, we elect people to various political offices with the belief that they will represent our ideologies. We believe that because they told us so when they were campaigning for office. When they take the oath of office, they quickly forget about the promises that they made to us and initiate their own agendas. We do not have to stand by and let politicians make decisions and enact legislation based on what they believe or to act according to the influence of lobbyists and special interest groups. Public policy should be based on the desires and needs of the people and not on personal agendas that are predisposed by a powerful few.

CH: What is new and different that you bring to your readers through your type of non-fiction writing?

BM: When tackling social and political issues, there is always a divide between the beliefs of black and white people. Anyone addressing those issues that separate blacks from whites should do it with the absence of any predispositions based on race. Therefore, I think that being biracial puts me in a position to analyze racism from the perspective of both white and black people. I refuse to take sides with either race based on the color of my skin or the color of anyone else’s skin. When writing about social issues and racism, I will address both races without prejudices and without biasness.

CH: Is there a message in your book that you want the readers to grasp?

BM: I want my readers—both white and black—to realize that a new generation of thinkers are emerging. They are removing the partition that has kept people separated based on the color of their skin. They have resigned themselves from what used to be. They are not afraid of multicultural diversity. It is an adjustment that we all must make sooner or later. However slow it may seem, things are changing, but we still live in a world that is color conscious, and we must let our minds evolve.

CH: You stated that “a broken social service system” is the cause of many problems. What would be your solution for this problem?

BM: While writing about a broken social service system, I was speaking of the interrelationships or the mutual relationships that exists between individuals, groups, and institutions and their social structure, as well. There are still too many blacks and too many whites that do not associate with each other simply because of their race. We should get to know each other better. The only way to do that is to talk and mingle. Some think that institutional racism is a thing of the past, but it is not.

Institutional racism is a form of racism expressed in the practice of social and political institutions, and being distinct from racism by individuals or informal social groups. It is reflected in disparities regarding criminal justice, employment, housing, health care, political power and education, among other things. Those that serve in these positions should be held accountable for their actions to make sure that their decisions are just and proper. Whenever equal justice and equal opportunity are sacrificed for personal reasons, then those responsible should be stripped of their rank and removed from their position.

When members of one race of people hate members of another race simply because of racial differences, then those people are ignorant and sick—they will remain like that until they become better educated; they must teach themselves, or someone must teach them that being different is alright—there’s no reason to be afraid when you see someone that is not the same color as you. Accountability is the key to making sure that all aspects of the social service system are administered fairly, and the same is true in politics. Politicians must be held accountable for their actions once elected. It should be like any other job, either you perform your duties, or be replaced.

CH: “Black and white people alike can be racist. We should stop making decisions based on the color of a person’s skin.” This has been said by many people for many years.  Do you think this issue will be resolved in the coming years?

BM: I honestly do believe that the day will come when racism will die. It will not be soon, but that day will come. Today, it is not uncommon to see white grandparents or great-grandparents walking around in public holding the hand of their racially mixed grandchild or great-grandchild. When seeing them, one has to wonder if they have always been blind to black and white relationships, or did they too, at one time see blacks as an inferior race of people. How do they feel now that their blood line has been forever tarnished? Are they proud of the new addition to their family that is part white and part black, or do they just tolerate them because they have no reasonable alternative? When seeing a mixed race family, or even black and white friends enjoying life together, they do pose a beautiful sight—like things are really getting closer to where they should be. Everyone that sees them should hope that what they are looking at is real and not just make believe.

CH: What kind of feedback are you getting from readers of the book?

BM: By far, most of the feedback that I get is positive. However, there are some who believe that I have failed to recognize the social changes that have taken place since the civil rights movement of the 1960’s. Some tell me that institutionalized racism is dead, but it is still alive. Below is some feedback from people that read a summary of End of the Rainbow. It was published in an online magazine.

  • Thanks for sharing with us unique perspectives of a talented writer! I am looking forward to reading End of Rainbow, as soon as possible.
  • I also share the same hope with the author when seeing mixed families. I hope that a consciousness of humanity arises above the present racial discriminations. I liked Mr. Miller’s style of writing, and his audacity to put forward thoughts without resorting to word games. He is straightforward, and he tells what is wrong with the US directly.
  • It is very sad that in our era of economic and political advancement racism is still on the rise. I do not know what people have in mind, but it is quite common thing in the United States to see the traces of racism in the daily life, people seem to be immune to their long-held beliefs.
  • Institutional racism—things that limited opportunities based on skin color— died at least four decades ago. The only active racism today is by 60’s throwbacks and a delusional, self-serving president. The subject would disappear altogether to the benefit of people distinguished by skin color if people would quit writing about it. Personal prejudice is a polyglot of perceptions to no cultural effect.

The last comment above seems to have been from someone with the opinion that writers like myself perpetuate racism. I think that whomever wrote that comment is a person that is delusional and will forever be what they are today—seeing no need to be anything other than what they already are.

CH: What was your favorite part while writing the book?

BM: I didn’t have a favorite part while writing End of the Rainbow. In fact, I hated everything that I wrote about. I wrote about truths that hurt when I think about them, but I did it anyway.

CH: Is there anything else you would like to share about the book?

BM: The last three or four chapters of the book are hypothetical, or conjectural, but not out of the range of possibilities should a radical group become strong enough to make it happen.

CH: So, what’s next for you as an author?

BM: Currently, I’m writing a book that is fiction. I like to let my mind run wild sometimes, and it doesn’t have to go very far to get there. It’s a book about Heaven and Hell, but not on the order of a religious book—far from it.

I am also writing a book about socio-political issues, and how they affect humanity. If world politics do not change, the human race will resort to survival of the fittest. I think that I will wait and publish this book after the 2016 presidential election—it will be published after the book of fiction.

CH: Can you give my audience your website address?

BM: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/1942BillMiller;

Facebook Fan Page: https://www.facebook.com/bmillerfanclub/?ref=hl; and Twitter Account: https://twitter.com/1942bmiller

CH: Can you tell my audience where your book is sold?

BM: Amazon.com and Create Space. Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/1TBPA7s

CH: Any closing remarks?

BM: I will close with the same words used to sum up the book, “The world is changing, we have to change with it. Don’t be afraid of diversity, embrace it or be miserable.”

CH: Thank you Bill Miller, it has been a real pleasure discussing your book and your opinions with my audience.  

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 If you find us deserving, please nominate us for Writer’s Digest “101 Best Sites for Writers.”  Email: writersdig@fwpubs.com with “101 Sites” in the subject line.  Type: “Cheryl Holloway Author Blog http://www.CherylHolloway.net/blog in the body of the email.  It’s that simple!  And “thank you” from all of us!

On this blog, I “Pay it Forward” to other authors by spotlighting them with a Guest Author Interview. I only ask that they too “Pay It Forward” to any other author.                                              ~ Cheryl Holloway

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Cheryl Holloway: 10 Interesting Writers Who Think Outside The Box in 2014

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Think Outside

Often times, when writing our stories, we feel boxed-in, but these 10 authors (alphabetically) were thinking outside the box. They each took a fresh look at an old topic and added their uniqueness to create a story with a different slant.

Fresh Idea

Recognition Cover  Bennett_Author

O. H. Bennett wrote about a wife’s recognition of her husband to create this twisting plot with thriller like intensity.                             http://www.cherylholloway.net/blog/2014/09/26/guest-author-interview-o-h-bennett/

Stone in the Crick_Cover     Granville Burgess

Granville Wyche Burgess  wrote about Amish life, romance and a murder to create a plot with many complications.                http://www.cherylholloway.net/blog/2014/11/25/guest-author-interview-granville-wyche-burgess/

51eudKMOI+L._AA160_      Chas photo 1

Charles Lober wrote about a Christmas Club, love and friendships to create a Christmas Club Trilogy.                                                                                      http://www.cherylholloway.net/blog/2014/12/25/guest-author-interview-charles-lober/

Endangered_Cover       Jean Cush

 Jean Love Cush wrote about endangered boys to create a provocative and compassionate thriller.                               http://www.cherylholloway.net/blog/2014/10/22/book-review-endangered-a-novel-by-jean-love-cush/

Seeds of Magnolia_Cover    Bill Miller

Bill Miller wrote about slaves who appeared to be white to create a historical novel about his ancestry.                                             http://www.cherylholloway.net/blog/2014/09/05/guest-author-interview-bill-miller/

FLATLINED_Cover    K S Oliver

K. S. Oliver wrote about the challenge of being flatlined and the challenges of illness to create a story about military families.               http://www.cherylholloway.net/blog/2014/07/18/k-s-oliver-guest-author-interview/

the_unthinkable_cover    author_lois_schaffer

Lois A. Schaffer wrote about banning illegal guns and created a memoir dedicated to her daughter.                                                      http://www.cherylholloway.net/blog/2014/03/14/lois-a-schaffer-guest-author-interview/

Forty Acres_Cover 2   Dwayne Smith

Dwayne Alexander Smith wrote about the preservation of the institution of slavery to create a novel of rage and passion.         http://www.cherylholloway.net/blog/2014/11/14/guest-author-interview-dwayne-alexander-smith/

Bluebutterfly_Cover   Marian L. Thomas

Marian L Thomas wrote a story about a black ballerina and created a powerful and dramatic story.                                       http://www.cherylholloway.net/blog/2014/05/02/marian-l-thomas-guest-author-interview/

Phantoms of Rockwood Amazon-Smashwords E-Book Cover (1)   juliusthompson2[1]

 J. E. Thompson wrote about teenage ghosts and created a story with hopes and dreams.                                                           http://www.cherylholloway.net/blog/2014/06/27/j-e-thompson-guest-author-interview/

 

The authors of the interesting books on this list were thinking outside the box and created wonderfully new stories from within for their readers.

Note: It was very hard for me to narrow the list down to just 10 authors. Happy Reading!

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Book Review: Seeds of Magnolia by Bill Miller

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Title: Seeds of Magnolia

Genre: Historical Fiction

Synopsis: The most peaceful years of Austin Miller’s life were before he married. Only he, Sophia and her mother, Elizabeth, were in the house. After his marriage, the house became a hotbed of chaos fueled by overzealous attitudes and unyielding temperaments. His marriage had been strained by adultery, and after it had been patched, they were separated by the war. Sophia’s best friends were three white girls that she grew up with. When seen by someone that did not know them, they would assume that all four were white. The color of their skin would not be enough to tell that one had a trace of black blood in her veins that made her a slave. Appearing to be white did not make a person white, and being black had its’ limitations. Yet, in a small southern town in Tennessee, Sophia ignored the social code regarding interracial relationships. Seeds of Magnolia unveils some of the stories that have been sheltered by the family—stories that have been kept in the closet, swept under the rug, or just gone untold.

Bill Miller

Author: Bill Miller                                                                                                         Note: Bill Miller is a first-time, self-published author.

For those readers who don’t know me, let me preface this book review by saying two things: I dislike historical books; and I dislike books that are almost 450 pages. But I started reading…

Just reading the synopsis captured my attention. This book was an emotional page-turner. I cried, I laughed, and I got angry…throughout the book to the very end.

The story began when Austin Miller purchased Elizabeth as his housekeeper from the Mrs. Taylor. Mr. Taylor had just died and they had recently moved from North Carolina to Tennessee. Mrs. Taylor was happy to get rid of them, since Elizabeth had been raped by Mr. Taylor, and had a baby, Sophia, who strongly resembled Mr. Taylor. Mrs. Taylor did not want to look at Sophia, a toddler, as a constant reminder of her deceased husband’s infidelity.  So, Elizabeth and her child were sold to Austin Miller.

Elizabeth had no idea if the Miller plantation would be any different than the Taylor plantation for their slaves. But indeed the Miller plantation was like no other plantation. On the Miller plantation, Sophia grew up with three playmates and best friends, Caroline, Amanda and Emily. And when people saw the four of them playing together, they assumed they were four white girls, and they didn’t realize that one of the girls was a slave.

Austin Miller was a lawyer, a politician and a wealthy single businessman, who worked long hours and just wanted peaceful evenings, so he didn’t bother correcting slave life at the plantation—as long as it felt right, he was fine. For many years, this was a peaceful life for Austin Miller, his slave housekeeper and her child.

Then Mr. Miller married a rich widow with two children and an arrogant attitude.  Mrs. Miller believed that slaves were at the bottom of the social class, while their owners were at the top of society and she ran her household as such, which contrasted with how Mr. Miller had run the household before his wife’s arrival.

Mrs. Miller had an inimitable personality and there was constant conflict between her and Sophia, who was now a teenager with an attitude, as well. Life happened during the next few years—Magnolia Manor was built, children were born, Mr. Miller was a member of the Senate, adultery scarred their marriage, friends came and friends were lost, love blossomed among slaves at bush harbor, and the family continued to grow in size.

Then the biggest change of all—the Civil War. It divided families, friends, the North and the South, slaves and slave owners. Mr. Miller left for his safety. Generals Grant and Sherman arrived to take over Magnolia Manor. Mrs. Miller and the slaves were left to fend for themselves during this time of destruction.

Absolutely nothing was the same after the Civil War was over. Life and attitudes would never be as they were prior to the war.

So much happened and I just couldn’t put the book down. When I finished reading, it was a sigh of relief and happiness, because my thirst had been quenched. I always enjoy it when an author mixes both history and fiction to make a truly believable and spell-bounding story.

There were some minor editing issues—misspelled and omitted words—that I attributed to the length of the book…450 pages. I am looking forward to the sequel. After reading Seeds of Magnolia, I can no longer say that I dislike historical books. LOL.

I wish Bill Miller much success in his writing endeavors.

I rate this book…

starstarstarstarstar

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DISCLAIMER

Endorsement Disclaimer: All reviews posted on this site and written by Cheryl Holloway are personal opinions of the book by the reviewer. The reviews are NOT paid endorsements of the book or the author. They are not advertisements. All reviews are honest, forthright and the opinion of the individual reviewer, freely given. Our opinions are not for sale.

Guest Author Interview – Bill Miller

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Seeds of Magnolia_Cover

Title: Seeds of Magnolia

Genre: Historical

Synopsis: The most peaceful years of Austin Miller’s life were before he married. Only he, Sophia and her mother, Elizabeth, were in the house. After his marriage, the house became a hotbed of chaos fueled by overzealous attitudes and unyielding temperaments. His marriage had been strained by adultery, and after it had been patched; they were separated by the war. Sophia’s best friends were three white girls that she grew up with. When seen by someone that did not know them, they would assume that all four were white. The color of their skin would not be enough to tell that one had a trace of black blood in her veins that made her a slave. Appearing to be white did not make a person white, and being black had its’ limitations. Yet, in a small southern town in Tennessee, Sophia ignored the social code regarding interracial relationships. Seeds of Magnolia unveils some of the stories that have been sheltered by the family—stories that have been kept in the closet, swept under the rug, or just gone untold.

Bill Miller

Author: Bill Miller

CH: Welcome, Bill. Thank you for joining me and allowing my readers to get to know you and generations of your family. The first question I have for you is can you please tell us in one sentence, why we should read your book.

BM: It was rare, but for a few people, Seeds of Magnolia describes a brighter side of the darkest chapter in our country’s history which was slavery, and that makes it a worthwhile read.

CH: What attracted you to write your ancestor’s history?

BM: I wanted to write about them because I don’t want them to be forgotten.  The things that I wrote about are things that were told to me by my father and his brothers and sisters, stories that have been handed down from one generation to the next.

I think, I’m the only one that remembers these stories anymore.  Recording them in the format of a book is my way of putting them in a place for safe-keeping.

CH: What is different and exciting that you bring to your readers through your historical writing?

BM: When we read about slavery, we know that sooner or later, we’ll get to the page that tells us about the chains and shackles.  But this time, there are no chains and no shackles.

The setting for Seeds of Magnolia is Bolivar, Tennessee, at the mansion referred to as Magnolia Manor.  It was built by Austin Miller, and it’s still there today; still being used.

Magnolia Manor is a place where a slave girl was allowed to grow up and experience a lifestyle more like that of a well to-do white girl.  It was a place where she could sometimes almost forget that she was a slave.

During the Civil War, Generals Grant, Sherman, Logan and McPherson used Magnolia Manor as their headquarters.

When General Grant knocked on the door, it was my great grandmother, a slave named Sophia that let them in.

Also, most books written about slavery are told from the viewpoint of someone on the outside looking in.  Seeds of Magnolia is told from the viewpoint of someone on the inside looking out.  That person on the inside being a slave. 

CH: Did you have to do any special research to write this book?

BM: There were some things that I had to research.  Maybe some of it was just to satisfy my own curiosity.  I always knew that my great-grandfather died at his plantation in Mississippi, but I never knew the cause of death.  I had to do some research to find out.

I knew that he was born in Guilford County, North Carolina, but I had to do some research to find out when he moved to Hardeman County, Tennessee.

So, there were a few things that I had to research, but most of the things that I wrote about were tucked away in my mind.  I just had to get it properly arranged and put into words. 

CH: Who was your favorite family member to write about or describe?

BM: That’s an easy question to answer.  Sophia was my favorite, and its’ probably reflected in my writing.  I felt a lot of compassion whenever my writing took me to her. She had the starring role, and I fell in love with her.

I loved describing the free-spirited lifestyle that Austin Miller allowed her to have.  I knew that he let her live that lifestyle, but when I started writing about it, it drew me closer to him.

While writing, I was always asking questions of myself.  Questions like, why did he allow her to be the way that she was …letting her learn how to read and write? Since she had spent a lifetime in his house, did he not see her as a slave …maybe because her skin was so white? Did the time ever come when he was in love with her?

Although I asked the questions, I knew that there would be no answers …just lots of questions.

CH: Was it painful to revisit some of the family issues or to talk about the situations for the first time in the book?

BM: It was painful describing how Sophia fell in love with a boy while attending church every Sunday at the bush harbor.

A bush harbor is a lattice like framework with tree branches placed on top to block the sun.

They looked forward to seeing each other every Sunday, and then one Sunday she went there to find out that he had been sold and taken away.  He was the first boy that she had ever loved.

I found it very painful when I wrote about Sophia begging Mrs. Miller not to put her on the auction block and sell her.  That was the most painful part of the entire book.

I became very emotional writing about it.  I’ve never told anyone before, but my eyes were filled with tears while I was writing.

CH: Are there any books that influenced you while writing this book?

BM: There were no other influences.  I was driven by the fact that I wanted to preserve what I know about my family’s heritage.  I know that when I die, there won’t be anyone else to tell the stories, and the stories will die with me.  They’ll be gone forever.

CH: What pitfalls have you run into as a new author? 

BM: Marketing is my biggest hurdle. There are a lot of authors, and it’s hard for a rookie to step onto the stage with them and be recognized.  It’s much easier to write a book than it is to sell one.

CH: You are so right about marketing and if an author doesn’t know that, they will soon learn it. So, who is your favorite author? Why?

BM: I don’t have a favorite author, but two of my favorite books are (1) This I Believe and (2) Physics for Future Presidents by Richard Muller.

CH: What book are you currently reading?

I just bought a copy of Dr. Ben Carson’s book, One Nation, but I haven’t read it yet.  When I have time to read, it’s usually college text books.  I like reading about science and history.

CH: On Amazon, you had 7 out of 7 five star reviews, and most of them wanted to see a movie. So, are there any other plans for this book? Any movie deals?

BM: No movie deals yet, but I believe that Seeds of Magnolia would be a great movie; set during the pre-post Civil War era with a completely different twist—one that’s real.

Every day, I hope that someone in the movie industry will hear about it and read it, and say, “yes, let’s do it.”

That’s having high expectations, but I think it’s realistic and not farfetched. The right person just has to read it.

CH: What’s next on the agenda in your writing career?

BM: Seeds of Magnolia is nonfiction. I could follow up with a sequel, but it might get me in trouble, because too many people would be too close to what I write.

But I am writing another book now; it’s fiction.

CH: Do you have a website?

BM: Yes, I have a website. It’s www.billmillerbooks.com

CH: Where is your book sold?

BM: Amazon sells the hardcopy.  It’s also available as an eBook at Amazon Kindle.

CH: Any closing remarks?

BM: I don’t know any of my white relatives anymore.  I would like to meet them and shake their hand, and maybe embrace each other, if they’re so inclined.

I suppose that someday some of them will read Seeds of Magnolia.  When they do, they’ll probably read about some things that they would rather I had left in the closet.  At the same time, I think, they will realize that I remembered to write with dignity.

Austin Miller owned my family as slaves.  In spite of that, I’m proud of my family heritage; I’m proud of who I am, and I’m proud of what I am.

It was wrong for him to own us, but still, I can’t make myself hate him, probably because I don’t want to, because he and Sophia are my great grandparents.

 CH: Thank you, Bill, and thank you for sharing your book, and the generations of the Miller family with my audience.  

 

Don’t Keep this Blog a Secret…Tell Your Friends about it!                                             Readers and followers, please share this post with your friends.

 If you find us deserving, please nominate us for Writer’s Digest “101 Best Sites for Writers.”  Email: writersdig@fwpubs.com with “101 Sites” in the subject line.  Type: “Cheryl Holloway Author Blog http://www.CherylHolloway.net/blog in the body of the email.  It’s that simple!  And “thank you” from all of us!

On this blog, I “Pay it Forward” to other authors by spotlighting them with a Guest Author Interview. I only ask that they too “Pay It Forward” to any other author.                                                                                                                       ~ Cheryl Holloway

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